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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
. started in 1912, the anc was created to peacefully advocate for political rights for south africa's blacks. mandela sees the future of the organization. >> he said we at the anc wanted to be a mass organization, and we needed a mass leader. and wen thun day nelson mandela walked into his office. he realized that's the guy. >> reporter: he becomes mandela's mentor and encourages him to earn a law degree. he also introduces mandela to his young cousin, evelyn masi. the two marry in 1946 and welcomed their first child, a son, that same year. their family will eventually grow to include another son and a daughter. another daughter had been born in 1947 but died within a year. racism and segregation had existed in south africa for as long as there had been white settlers, the majority of them were descendants of the dutch and call themselves afrikaners. in 1948 the national party sweeps boo powers and codifies those apartheid policies into law. >> they were trying to achieve this kind of ethnic fragmentation of the country here in order to give the afrikaner nation its own homeland. >> reporter
in the ranks of leadership of a civil rights group called the african national congress, the a.n.c. >> they were the revolutionaries of their day. they were the wild young men. >> teichner: former "time" magazine editor rick stengel spent countless hours in private conversation with mandela while collaborating on mandela's autobiography. >> mandela went to johannesburg as a young man and was treated in the terrible way that young black men were treated in the 1950s. i think this had a huge effect on him. >> teichner: mandela was in the forefront of growing resistance by the a.n.c., which began to protest the hated laws requiring blacks to carry passes, restricting where they could go. then, a galvanizing moment caught the world's attention. on march 21, 1960, in sharpeville, the peaceful civil rights movement was pierced with bullets. ( gunfire ) walter cronkite reported. >> police mounted on tanks opened fire. 69 natives were killed, 176 wounded. most of the victims were shot in the back. >> teichner: it was against this blood-red backdrop that nelson mandela took up arms. >> it i
. it was a process threatened by violence and the smile disappeared as the anc leader berated those he held responsible, including f.w. de klerk. for nelson mandela the process was never personal. >> we are not dealing with a man, with an individual. we are dealing with a government with a system. >> as a country was pushed and pulled towards democracy. nelson mandela and f.w. de klerk were awarded the "the new york observer." then on the 27th of april 1, '94. south africans of all political persuasions and colours went to the polls. among them nelson mandela voting for the first time. he became the president of a country in which he had been an outlaw. one in which he said the people now governed. >> on this day, you the people took your destiny into your own hands. you decided that nothing would prevent you from exercises your hard-won right to elect a government of your choice. >> after one term as president, nelson mandela did what few leaders in the contain anti did before, stepping down with humour and grace. >> the time has come to hand over. >> at the age of 78 nelson mandela tirele
and a leading voice in the african national congress, the anc. struggling to end the inequality of apartheid, white ruled south africa's policy of racial segregation. but in 1960 after police shot and killed 49 protestors, the anc which had always been nonviolent created a military wing under mandela's command. >> there are many people who feel that it's useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against the government. >> reporter: the regime determined to maintain white rule saw the inspiring young revolutionary as a threat. >> our struggle is truly national. it is a struggle for the right to live. >> reporter: mandela was imprisoned in 1962 and two years later sentenced to life in prison, accused of working to overthrow the government. in court, on trial for his life he said this. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live and to see realized, but my lord, if it needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: four miles off the coast of cape town south africa on robben island, he sp
mandela and te other anc lieder leaders who wee heavily influenced by them. the older men learned a lot by the youth that came into the island and it became an ep pi center of two give generations discussing how to end the apartheid government. that is why it's so significant in the nature of this country and the legacy of nelson mandela. >> it remained wi winnie's homer a number of years did nelson mandela ever go back to the house? >> he go he spent a short while here when he came out of prison. the first thing he did was come home where he was greeted by hundredses of thousands of people from this particular area his wife remained here for much of the time he was in prison. she was removed from the house and banished to a remote town hundreds of miles away from johannesburg both as punishment and to remove her and mande mans influence his daughter continued to remain in the house i. it gives you a taste to see how bad and repressive that they were at that time. and a 17-year-old daughter left to fend for herself in this house. >> describe the impact mandela and his policies had on th
in south africa. but having him work with his team and the pollster for the anc during that first election, there were three things that really struck me. one was just his enormous clarity and vision for the country and bringing the country together. the second was his great pragmatism. there were a set of election rules that came down that were really disadvantageous to mandela and to the anc. we were all very upset by those rules, and he was just very calm and said no, we'll make it work. find a way to make it work. he refused to fight over the rules and just said we'll make it work. >> give us some unsight into that. what were his unique qualities that allowed him to make it work? in the face of what seemed to be something that was very difficult if not insurmountable. >> i think, first of all, was just the clarity of his own vision. the amount of thinking that he had done about where he wanted to take the country and what reconciliation meant. and how he had already put that to practice. that was so fundamental to his soul. and what was interesting is, of course, there were many factio
but he wasn't the leader of it. he embodied the anc's approach, their principles. but he wasn't the only one. during my time in south africa, especially in the late '80s, when apartheid still existed, i met any number of south african, leaders, rank and pile, who had been through terrible injustice. fellow graduates of robin island, for example. people who had been tortured or under banning orders. and almost to a person i heard similar words from them that we heard from nelson mandela after he was released from prison. and in many ways my love for south africa and my inspiration from south africans came from those years when mandela was still in prison, when we didn't even know what he looked like because there was only one old picture. he was the leader. he was the "avatar" of the movement. but there's much, much more, and he was standing on a firm base, firm foundation. >> you know, it's been surprising, mark, you know, on the one handle, this effort to sanitize mandela that we're seeing now, you know, i'm trying to make this kind of play around king, and yet also -- and this is maybe
of negotiation, not always with the support of his colleagues in the anc, in order to deliver not just a transfer of power that offered the prospect of peace for all the people of south africa. mandela once notably said, "this is not about moving from white domination to black domination. there must be no domination of either community." he was an extraordinary man in not only believing that but practising it with every fibre of his being. as we look today at the lessons of mandela's extraordinary life and incredible achievements, at his contribution not just to south africa, which goes without saying, but to the wider world and at why he has become such an iconic figure, two factors stand out. first, he is perhaps the best example we have had in the past 100 years of how political leaders, by force of personality, transform themselves from politicians into statesman can by their sheer personal effort change the world and make what was impossible possible and then deliver it. he is not the only one who has done so. we should not think of him as unique. gorbachev, by the force of his personality,
in the anc, the african national congress which until the so-called massacre had advocated only peaceful protests. >> there are many people who feel that it is useful for us to continue talking nonviolence against the government. on defenseless people. >> mandela was one of those people he founded the armed wing of anc. considered a revolutionary he was put on trial for sabotage and conspiracy, his defense was a defiant four and a half hour speech that ended this way. >> i have fought against and i have fought against. >> the ideal of democratic and free society he went on. >> for which i am prepared to die. >> he expect to be hanged instead he was sentenced to life in prison. but even locked up nelson mandela was considered a terrorist by the south african government. you could be jailed for wearing a t-shirt like this one or carrying a sign. >> we demand the unconditional release of nelson mandela! >> international pressure to end apartheid and free nelson mandela was incensed. the star studded rock concert held in london in honor of his 70th birthday was seen on television by hundreds
was an advocate of nonviolence. becoming a leading voice in the african national congress, the anc. but in 1960, after police shot and killed 69 protesters, the anc, which had always been nonviolent, created a military wing, under mandela's command. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. >> reporter: undaunted by the brutality and inequality that was apartheid rule, mandela remained determined to end the government's forced racial segregation. >> our struggle is a truly national one. it is a struggle for the right to live. >> reporter: a struggle that led to mandela's imprisonment in 1962. and two years later, a life sentence for working to overthrow the government. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live for and to see realized. but my lords, if it needs be, it is an idea for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: four miles off the coast of capetown, south africa, on robben island, mandela spent mos
'm a loyal member of the anc. the world had changed and had to go away from the socialist philosophy. he changed radically in a very short amount of time. one of the things he always said to me, he was never high bound about haenging his mind. he said when circumstances change i changed my mind. what do you do. another great lesson for politicians. so he evolved so tremendously when he came out of prison. it was astonishing to watch. >> it is astonishing. incredible story. >> the transition between icon to being in power is one of those impossible things to do. >> it was much more difficult coming out of prison and being a practical politician than being in prison. mandela's greatest teacher said i haven't had a good night's sleep since i left prison because now have responsibility. >> in 1994 brian williams interviewed nelson mandela. he asked him about his predecessor f.w. de klerk. >> my relationship with mr. de klerk and he's one of those south africans that i hold in high regard. we have had differences where we said cruel things to each other but at the end of the day, we're able t
amazing story that he told me was on the night before they left prison calling all the anc prisoners together and saying, yes, they would be justified in acts of revenge, retaliation and retribution, but there could never then be a strong, successful, multiracial society, and that was his second great achievement, to achieve change through reconciliation. but, you know, there was a didder achievement, refusing to rest or relax when he gave up the presidency. he had great achievement to his name. he himself wrote that in the first part of his life he had climbed one great mountain to end apartheid, but now in his later life he wanted to climb another great mountain, to rid the world of poverty and especially the outrage of child poverty. and i need speak of only what i saw in the times that i worked with him, how quietly and without fanfare he went about his work. 2005 i flew to south africa to meet nelson mandela to persuade him to come to london so that he could then persuade the finance ministers of the need for debt relief to relieve poverty, and this he did. and then in 2006 with
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)